The 81st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (2012)


Building an ecosystem of data: expanding the Open Research Scan Archive (ORSA) through institutional collaboration

ANNA N. DHODY1,2, JANET MONGE2, LORI M. JAHNKE1,3, JACQUI E. BOWMAN1,2, SAMANTHA COX2 and P TOM. SCHOENEMMANN4.

1Mütter Museum, The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, 2Physical Anthropology Section, The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3Van Pelt Library, The University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anthropology, Indiana University

Thursday All day, Plaza Level Add to calendar

Now that ORSA has achieved a critical mass of CT scans and researcher interest, we are exploring ways of developing it to facilitate data integration and data portability. Rapid expansion in the use of Linked Data protocols by museums and archives are paving the way for new possibilities in data collection and dissemination. ORSA has the potential to forge new connections to data sources beyond biological anthropology.

ORSA (http://plum.museum.upenn.edu/~orsa/Welcome.html) was created in 2002. Since then the archive has grown to include over 1800 crania and over 4000 CT scans. ORSA (formerly: Penn Cranial CT Database) has distributed these scans to more than 100 scholars and students all over the world. In 2008 the Penn Museum reached out to the Mütter Museum of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia in an effort to expand the scope of the archive beyond the Penn owned material. The Mütter Museum is home to the Hyrtl Skull Collection, which comprises 138 known individuals, collected by Joseph Hyrtl, MD in the mid-19th century. The Academy of Natural Sciences and The American Philosophical Society have also contributed to the collections data. Access to the archive is free and open to the public and researchers may request high resolution scans.

ORSA funded by NSF (grant #0447271).

Tweet
comments powered by Disqus