The 81st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (2012)


Post-European contact Native American female and male population histories inferred from the analysis of mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes

MARY P. ROGERS1, DENA GOLDBERG1, CRIS HUGHES1, ALYSON RODE1, JESSE W. JOHNSON1 and RIPAN S. MALHI1,2.

1Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2Institute of Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Mitochondrial genomes, which are maternally inherited, and Y-chromosomes, which are paternally inherited, can be used to infer the population history of females and males, respectively. Addressing the question of the effects of European contact in Native American communities, we extracted DNA from buccal swabs/saliva from nearly 100 individuals from three First Nation communities in British Columbia, Canada. Specifically, we determined the mitochondrial DNA haplogroup by sequencing the Control Region of the mitochondrial genome. In addition, we determined the Y-chromosome haplogroup by genotyping diagnostic SNPs using ABI Taqman assays. Our results show a consistent pattern for all three populations where Y-chromosomes inferred to be of European origin are in higher frequency relative to mitochondrial genomes inferred to be of European origin. The results suggest that following European contact, European males admixed with Native American females in higher frequency than European females admixing with Native American males in British Columbia. This interpretation of the DNA analysis agrees with documents and accounts of the history of British Columbia.

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