The 81st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (2012)


Patterns of dental eruption and growth in a wild population of Guinea baboons (Papio h. papio) in the Department of Kedougou, Senegal

BRENDA R. BENEFIT1, EVAN SIMONS1, OUSMANE M. DIOP3, MAWLOUTH DIALLO2, AMADOU A. SALL3, KATHRYN A. HANLEY4, SCOTT C. WEAVER5 and DEREK D.A. CUMMINGS6.

1Department of Anthropology, New Mexico State University, 2Laboratoire d'Entomologie Médicale, Institut Pasteur de Dakar, 3Institut Pasteur, Dakar, Sénégal, 4Department of Biology, New Mexico State University, 5Institute for Human Infections and Immunity and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, 6Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

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Little is known about the growth and development of Papio h. papio in the wild. Data relevant to addressing this deficiency (dental casts, photographs, and somatic measurements) were collected during the trapping of 267Guinea baboons in the Department of Kedougou, southeastern Senegal, as part of a long-term study of sylvatic, mosquito-borne viruses. Relative ages of the baboons were assessed through a combination of dental eruption and tooth-wear patterns. All age groups occurred in the sample, indicating they represent a reasonable cross-section of the population.

The dental eruption sequence for Guinea baboons was found to differ somewhat from both yellow and olive baboons, as upper I2 emerges only after lower I2 is completely erupted. In male Guinea baboons, upper P3 erupts after both M2s are fully erupted, but in yellow and olive baboons both P3s erupt isochronally with M2. Male Guinea baboons are more similar to yellow than to olive baboons in having upper canines erupt after lower P3, and lower M3 before upper M3.

Plots of body weight and other measurements against age demonstrate female progenesis, with females ceasing their growth at about age five and males continuing to grow until about age eight, similar to other baboons. At age eight, body weight sexual dimorphism is high, with males (n=15) averaging 19.05 kg and females (n=13) averaging 10.92 kg. Measurements for all body proportions were found to be less in the oldest members of the sample, possibly tracking local climate history (severe drought) experienced during their developmental years.

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