The 82nd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (2013)


Withdrawn. Bioarchaeological Case Studies from the early Medieval Site of Pohansko near Břeclav, Czech Republic

KELLI L. KEITH1, VERONICA I. BĂRCUŢEAN2, MICHAEL D. JANAS3, JAMES R. MCGINTY4, ANDREA OAXACA5 and MICHAEL J. DIETZ4.

1Department of Anthropology, East Carolina University, 2Department of Sociology and Anthropology, North Central College, 3Department of Anthropology, Northern Illinois University, 4Department of Anthropology, College of DuPage, 5Department of Anthropology, James Madison University

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Within any skeletal population a bioarchaeologist may observe individuals with interesting skeletal anomalies, including individuals who present skeletal data that warrants presentation in the form of a case study. Two adult skeletons from the early Medieval site of Pohansko near Břeclav (Czech Republic) are described based on anthroposcopic analysis. Pohansko is one of three major administrative centers of Great Moravia, a Slavic state that flourished in the 9th and early 10th centuries, A.D. The first individual is a female with a mid-diaphyseal amputation of the right tibia and fibula with significant remodeling. The second individual is a male with asymmetrical degenerative joint disease and well developed muscle markings. He had moderate to severe tooth wear, which is consistent with using teeth as tools (Capasso, Kennedy and Wilczak 1999). The lower central incisors have significant wear on the labial surface, and the right upper canine and lateral incisor have V-shaped wear, indicating he used his teeth in the preparation and/or utilization of leather, string, or some similarly sinuous material. Both individuals were buried near the second church at Pohansko, located just north of the bastion. An initial mortuary analysis, and conclusions from previous archaeological research, suggests these individuals are of high status. For both individuals we discuss the consequences that their activity-related skeletal modifications, pathology and trauma may have had on day-to-day life. Using skeletal data and mortuary analysis we describe potential habitual activities, which could have led to the skeletal characteristics present at the time of their deaths.

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